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The hazards of work-related RSI

On Behalf of | Nov 4, 2021 | Firm News |

Repetitive strain injury, or RSI, is a type of injury related to repetitive motions or strain from overuse of the same muscles. Workers in San Diego and elsewhere may experience a job-related RSI that progressively gets worse over time due to the nature of their work, which eventually may develop into an occupational disease.

There are many different types of RSIs, including the well-known carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and many of these are related to the use of modern technological devices in the work environment.

Some characteristics of an RSI are repetitive motions which may affect not only the part of the body performing that action, but also the muscles in another part. Monotony or psychological stress can make the symptoms worse. Workplace accommodations can lessen the symptoms or even prevent an RSI from occurring, and employers in California must provide reasonable accommodations to a worker who requests them to perform their function.

Conditions resulting from an RSI

 Of the many office activities that create strain, doctors in general diagnose the condition as either:

  • Type 1 RSI, which is a musculoskeletal disorder with symptoms that include swelling and inflammation of the effected area
  • Type 2 RSI related to nerve damage from a number of work activities

Some examples of an RSI are bursitis, tendonitis, CTS, Raynaud’s disease and rotator cuff syndrome. There are a wide variety of activities that can cause an RSI, including:

  • Working with vibrating equipment
  • Carrying heavy loads
  • Holding the same posture for extended periods, or working in conditions that require direct pressure to the same areas
  • Overusing the same muscle group daily
  • Tedious and repetitive work

Worker’s compensation

Worker’s compensation in California is a comprehensive program that covers such work-related RSIs as repeated exposures to repetitive motions, and covers an injured worker’s medical care, temporary or permanent disability benefits, and supplemental job displacement or death benefits.

There are specific timelines for filing forms, getting approved treatments and additional benefits as necessary. Many injured workers become frustrated when they receive an initial denial on their claim, so having guidance through the process can help you to more easily work your way through the claims process in order to get the compensation you deserve.

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